International Drawing and Cognition Research

We are an interdisciplinary research network. We meet annually, foster collaboration and publish on drawing and cognition.

2013 Schedule on 26/08/2013 at 13:18

Click on specific days for links to detailed schedules. Please check back for updates.

Thursday, October 24 at Teachers College

Thursday is devoted to concurrent presentations by artists and researchers from the Drawing Research Network, followed by drawing performances in the evening and an opportunity to view the ‘Tracing Experience’ exhibition in the Macy Gallery.

Friday, October 25 at the Metropolitan Museum

The Friday sessions will be held in the galleries and Uris Education Center at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The day will consist primarily of participatory drawing workshops, conducted by museum staff and invited guests, which will engage participants in the museum spaces and collections in novel ways. Please sign up at the registration desk to ensure a place in your chosen workshops.

A mid-day plenary session, “Drawing as a tool for thought,” will highlight key issues in drawing pedagogy, research and practice.
Saturday, October 26 at Teachers College, Columbia University

Saturday will find us back at Teachers College for a series of panel discussions with experts from a range of disciplines. The conference will end on Saturday evening with a reception for the concurrent drawing exhibition in the Macy Gallery at Teachers College, entitled, “Tracing Experience.”

CALL FOR PAPERS: The 2014 Congress of the International Association of Empirical Aesthetics (IAEA), NYC, August 22-24, 2014. on 25/02/2014 at 10:27

Aaron Kozbelt here. 

I would hope this would be of interest to the TTD crowd.

I'm co-organizing the 2014 meeting of the International Association of Empirical Aesthetics in NYC in August.

CALL FOR PAPERS: IAEA 2014
The 2014 Congress of the International Association of Empirical Aesthetics (IAEA) will be held in New York City from August 22-24, 2014.

Abstracts - due April 1 

See http://iaea2014.weebly.com

Many thanks, and I hope you're all well

All best,
Aaron

Thursday Presenters on 23/10/2013 at 06:33

Elisa Alaluusua is a PhD researcher at the University of the Arts London and a practicing artist and educator. Originally from a reindeer farm in Finnish Lapland she moved to England first time in 1994. Since 2000 Alaluusua has taught Fine Art at Westminster School which is a highly selective independent school in central London for 14 to 18 year olds. Her practice involves drawing and video works (see www.ealaluusua.com). Since 2009 Alaluusua has been conducting research at the UAL around the topic of “Sketchbooks – a Qualitative Analysis of the Creative Strategies Used in Sketchbooks by Novice and Expert Artists”. She has exhibited internationally since early 1990s. The most recent works include 24h Drawing III, Cafe Gallery, London (Apr13); 24h Drawing II, Pullens Yard, London (Dec12); 24h Drawing I, Westminster School, London (Sept12); Sketchbooks of Michael Sandle –video, Royal Academy of Arts, London (Nov11-Feb12). Elisa Alaluusua, PhD student at the University of the Arts London. e.alaluusua2@chelsea.arts.ac.uk

Gemma Anderson is a London and Cornwall-based artist, PhD researcher and lecturer whose practice is at the interface of art and science (artistic research in a scientific context). After studying Fine Art Printmaking at the Royal College of Art and Falmouth University, and working on collaborative projects with mathematicians and natural scientists, she is now completing a practice based PhD. Among her recent projects are Portraits: Patients and Psychiatrists and the Jerwood Foundation Visual Artist in Residence programme in London. She received the Leverhulme Artist in Residence Award, the Wellcome Trust Arts Award, the Thomas Dammann Memorial Trust Award and the Arts Council Purchase Award. Her work has been exhibited internationally, including at the Freud Museum and the Wellcome Collection (London) and in her recent solo exhibition ‘Isomorphology’ in London and Berlin. She is Associate Lecturer of Drawing and Fine Art at Falmouth University, Cornwall and was a keynote speaker at the Thinking through Drawing symposium, in London in 2012. Recent publications include Endangered: A study of the Declining Practice of Morphological Drawing in Zoological Taxonomy and On Drawing and Mathematics: From Inverse Vision to the Liberation of Form published in Leonardo, alongside a limited edition Artist’s Book Isomorphology: An Introduction with Super-Collider, London.

Shaun Belcher is a poet, multimedia lecturer and musician, art critic and practicing artist. He was born in Oxford, England 1959 and currently lives in Nottingham, England. Shaun currently teaches web and graphic design and research across the Multimedia B.A. and Foundation Media Creatives Courses. He’s working by Registered Project in Fine Art at Nottingham Trent University investigating art and design pedagogy through visual thinking.

Born in Greece, Eirini  Boukla has lived and worked in the UK since 2000. Her focus is the practice of drawing into painting whose main interest and research centres itself in concepts of tracing and its corresponding ideas of authenticity and originality. Tracing has become an increasingly fundamental constituent in her work, both conceptually and in terms of process. Taking as a starting point the act of tracing, she looks to challenge the canonical tradition of the judgment of the eye and the received idea of originality. The work is formed through a process of superimposed/juxtaposed layers of manually traced, re-traced ‘already’ produced and circulating materials, which speculates on questions of the origin of a mark and the production of an individual voice.  Since 2009, she has been working on a full-time AHRC funded, practice led- research PhD at the University of Leeds.

Rebecca Chamberlain has just completed her PhD in the Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology department at University College London. She is now a post-doctoral fellow at the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium working with Professor Johan Wagemans on autistic processing and visual art. Her educational background lies within art, psychology and philosophy and as such she takes an interdisciplinary approach to her research. Her PhD thesis explored the cognitive foundations of drawing ability with a particular emphasis on the role of visual perception in drawing.

Jim Dawkins is an assistant professor of Interior Design at The Florida State University where he serves as an instructor in both undergraduate and graduate studios. He is a registered architect in several states, having earned his BA in Design and Master of Architecture degrees from Clemson University prior to practicing for twenty years as an architect, designer and corporate officer with design firms in Atlanta, GA and Vail, CO. Dawkins’ research interest focuses on graphic facilitation, communication, and mediation of ideas through hand-drawing techniques and their realization in hybrid forms of computer aided design.

João dos Santos is an artist  and lecturer at ESAD (School of Arts and Design, Caldas da Rainha) Polytechnic Institute of Leiria, Portugal. Having concluded his PhD in Visual Arts and Intermedia – Drawing, at the Polytechnic University of Valencia with the thesis “Estudio teórico-práctico de la Camera Obscura y de la Camera Lucida. Una nueva propuesta de máquina de dibujo digital”. (“A theoretical and practical study of the Camera Obscura and the Camera Lucida. A new proposal for a digital drawing machine”) He explored the theme of drawing and seeing, using devices for the creation of a digital drawing machine. The study evolved into the on-going project named “Translations”. João’s main areas of interest are related to the act of seeing and drawing, and by means of drawing machines, such as tracing and the exploration of possible uses for the digital mediation of drawing. Another area of interest concerns the drawing materials and their relation to the procedures and the production of drawings. senhorjsantos@gmail.com

Joe Graham is a PhD candidate in Drawing Research at SOTA, Loughborough University, 2011 – present. He received his MFA Fine Art Media, The Slade School of Art, London, 2010 and his BA hons in Painting from Chelsea School of Art & Design, 2002. His current research is working towards an understanding of drawing as a metaphor for the mind. The enquiry centres on a predominantly phenomenological investigation of the relationship between subject and object. Within the object of drawing, he is looking at the relationship between the ‘positive/negative’ areas through sequentially produced transfer drawings. Within the subject he is referring to the functioning of the mind as described through the context of ‘fringe’ phenomenology. The fringe is understood as “… the equivalent of condensed information; not fully conscious sensorial and conceptual contents” (Lavazza, 2008).”

Claire Hannibal is an architect and senior lecturer at the Leeds School of Architecture. She completed her PhD at Liverpool University supported by an EPSRC Doctoral Award, which examined the role of digital sketching in architecture. Her main teaching and research interests include drawing, visualisation and communication, relating particularly to the ways in which we engage with the creative design process. With a background in fine art she is also interested in the blurred lines between art and architecture. | Ann Stewart a.l.stewart@leedsmet.ac.uk Ann is a chartered town planner and an associate lecturer at the Leeds School of Architecture, where she teaches in the undergraduate design studio. With a background in architecture she has extensive experience of professional design disciplines and an interest in the role of ‘craft’ as a tool to augment design thinking, communication and collaboration. She is currently studying for her PhD at the Bartlett, University College London.

Courtney Lee Weida is Assistant Professor of Art Education at Adelphi University. She is interested in digital learning communities and contemporary craft. She is also a practicing artist and can be reached via www.courtneyweida.com.

Jill Pable, FIDEC, ASID is associate Professor of Interior Design at Florida State University and directs the graduate program. She has B.S. and M.F.A. degrees in Interior Design and a Ph.D. degree in Instructional Technology with specialization in architecture. She served as national president of the Interior Design Educators Council in 2009. She is the author of Sketching Interiors at the Speed of Thought and co-author of Interior Design: Practical Strategies for Teaching and Learning with Katherine Ankerson. Her research focuses on the design of environments for the underprivileged and she believes that design can make life more interesting, fulfilling and humane.

jpable@fsu.edu

Ray Lucas has a PhD in Social Anthropology proposing A Theory of Notation as a Thinking Tool and an MPhil for the thesis Filmic Architecture. Lucas is a Senior Lecturer in Architecture at Manchester School of Architecture, and has held research positions examining designing for and with the sensory experience of urban spaces, the role of the voice in public realm, and the mappable/un-mappable nature of Jakarta. Current research a study of the urban marketplace in South Korea is also underway as a demonstration of Lucas’ Graphic Anthropology method and theory. Lucas is writing Architectural Research: A Handbook to Context, Precedent, and Theory for Laurence King Publishers as well as a monograph titled Drawing Parallels: Knowledge production in axonometric, isometric, and oblique drawings for Ashgate. Lucas is an Associate Researcher to the European Research Council project Knowing from the Inside led by anthropologist Tim Ingold at the University of Aberdeen.

Sean Justice is an artist and art educator who makes pictures and other objects using photography, language, and the Internet. He is a doctoral candidate at Teachers College in the Art and Art Education Program. Columbia University, Teachers College. justice@tc.columbia.edu

Tree Williams is a mixed-media abstract painter who layers form and movement together in a visual response to the fluctuation of nature. She is a doctoral student at Teachers College in the Art and Art Education Program. | Columbia University, Teachers College. tw2346@columbia.edu

Lynn Imperatore began to draw before any doubt registered regarding this curious facility. Early mastery, instigated by a combination of short-sightedness and migraine-related visual disturbance, presented drawing as essential means for mapping the perceptual. Her work focuses on interplays between drawing, imagination, and input from the peripheries of the vision. She is currently engaged in a practice-led PhD at UWE/Bristol, UK, titled: Out of the Corner of the Eye (the ‘I)’: A practice-led inquiry into imagination at the peripheries of attention – that examines drawing in its capacity to articulate the unexpected edges of the visible. | Lynn attended School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and received a BA from New York University and an MFA in Visual Art from Vermont College of Fine Arts. She taught in university, post-graduate and adult education in the United States (before relocating to the UK in 2008), and has exhibited widely in the US, as well as in the UK and Europe. | PhD Researcher, Department of Art & Design, Faculty of Arts, Creative Industries and Education, University of the West of England (UWE), Bristol, UK | Co-Editor, HATCH: Drawing Incubation Project, PLaCE International Research Centre, UK | Contact: lynnimp@gmail.com

Nick Sousanis is a doctoral candidate at Teachers College, Columbia University. His dissertation on “unflattening,” centers on the importance of multiple ways of seeing as a means of fostering curiosity and facilitating creative discovery. The work will be undertaken entirely in comic book format – hence, it addresses in form what it seeks to in content. Prior to his arrival in New York, he was heavily involved in Detroit’s arts community where among other things he co-founded and ran www.thedetroiter.com, an arts and cultural web-magazine; chaired the Contemporary Art Institute of Detroit (CAID); and served as the founding director of the University of Michigan’s Work : Detroit Gallery. During his time in Detroit, he came to be the biographer of legendary Detroit artist Charles McGee, which is forthcoming from Wayne State University Press. He also taught public speaking and writing at Wayne State University. A former competitor on the professional tennis circuit, Sousanis continues to teach the game to students of all ages. Sousanis recently co-organized the interdisciplinary conference Creativity, Play, and the Imagination held in May 2011 at Teachers College in conjunction with an art exhibition of educational games called Game Show NYC, the gatherings sought not only to discuss creativity and play, but bring participants together to actively engage in imagining and creating. Information about both at http://www.gameshownyc.com andhttp://blogs.tc.columbia.edu/creativityconference2011. Recently, his comics works have been featured as chapters in books on education, including “Dear Maxine” and “Narrative Inquiry,” both from Teachers College Press. He has also presented on creativity and comics at conferences including AERA and ATINER in Athens, Greece. Samples of his educational comics (including excerpts from his dissertation) can be seen at www.spinweaveandcut.com.

Pattie Belle Hastings is an artist, designer, author, and a professor in the Visual and Performing Arts at Quinnipiac University. Her creative work deals specifically with the feminist issues of women/gender and technology. She lives and works in New Haven, CT and Frogn, Norway. She likes to work across and between media. Each body of work is expressed through different forms: book, web, performance, video, projection, and print. Her work embraces a broad range of ideas and concerns: the role of technology in the lives of women; the controlling interests behind technology development; the interests of particular users; the built in conflict of the two previous items; and the social forces underlying gender identity.

Simon Downs studied illustration (of a particularly traditional school). The evolution of the computer aided design sphere caused him to rethink this traditional practice. In turn he became a digital illustrator, digital animator, interaction and multimedia designer and editorial designer. He worked in London, designing for the finance and publishing sectors. In the year 2000 he became a university lecturer, which caused another round of reflection, a process which continued in 2003 when he joined Loughborough University as a lecturer and design researcher. Simon has been an editor with the journal TRACEY since 2003, founded the the political visual culture journal The Poster with Intellect Books in 2009 (as Lead Editor), wrote the book The Graphic Communication Handbook in 2011 for Routledge (in which year he also won the Loughborough University Lecturer of the Year award). He writes on visual communication systems (including drawing), is a Director of the Drawing Research Network and is a trades union representative for the UCU union.

Paula Dawson is a Sydney based artist whose work has pioneered holography within Australia and Internationally. Paula has exhibited extensively both internationally and in Australia, with solo and group exhibitions at the National Portrait Gallery, Art Gallery of New South

Wales and MIT Museum (USA). Paula believes in imagination and compassion as two of the most precious resources on the planet and her work seeks to expand these in qualitative and quantative ways. Currently Paula is a lead researcher on the Holoshop research project for the design and evaluation of rapid 3D drawing technology for content creation in holograms and other 3D displays and an Associate Professor at the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales where she teaches painting and drawing.

Jack Southern’s creative work spans teaching, research, writing, curatorial practice, as well as his work as an independent artist. In recent years Southern has also managed large-scale collaborative projects which have culminated in published works including, Guardian Guide to Drawing, (Guardian newspaper, 2009), and more recently as co-author of Drawing Projects: An Exploration Of The Language Of Drawing, Black Dog publishing, London<http://blackdogonline.com/all-books/drawing-projects.html> (first edition published, July 2011). Southern is currently orgainising and managing a diverse Drawing based project which will culminate in an exhibition and series of discussions/talks at the Drawing Room, London in January / February 2014.

Raquel Pelayo is professor of drawing at Faculty of Architecture of the University of Porto (FAUP) in Portugal. Graduated in Painting, Master in Art History and Doctor in Philosophy in Education, she is also researcher at i2ads research center at Faculty of Arts of the University of Porto.  mpelayo@arq.up.pt

Nuno Lacerda Lopes is professor of Construction at Faculty of Architecture of the University of Porto (FAUP) in Portugal. Graduated in Architecture and Doctor in Philosophy in Architecture, he is also a practitioner architect and researcher at CEAU research center at Faculty of Architecture of the University of Porto.  nunolacerda@cnll.pt

Louis Netter is an illustrator and Lecturer at the University of Portsmouth. His research has been focused on the flexibility of drawing to communicate a wide range of human experience in social, political and narrative based works. His illustration work has been published in numerous magazines and his artwork is collected in several major institutions including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Library of Congress and the New York Historical Society. He has been a lecturer at Parsons School of Design, SUNY Purchase, The College of New Rochelle and Westchester Community College. His sketchbook work has been published in TRACEY and he maintains a website devoted to his personal reportage at www.lifestooshortfornuance.com lou@louisnetter.com

Alexander Tibus is a graphic designer and Lecturer for information design and typography at the University of Portsmouth. He researches on optical illusions in typeface design and time-based typography. His work has been internationally awarded, exhibited and published in several books and design magazines like Creative Review, Novum and others. Since 2010, he has lectured in Egypt, Germany and the UK. Along the way, the information design work of his students was exhibited in Cairo and Berlin. Tibus is a member of the professional bodies IDZ – International Design Centre Berlin and Berliner Gestalten.  info@alexandertibus.de

Jenny Wright, currently a PhD student at the University of the Arts London, is researching the haptic nature of drawing and medical practice. Her director of studies is Professor Stephen Scrivener, second supervisor Professor Deanna Petherbridge CBE. Mr Neil Shah consultant maxillofacial surgeon at The London Hospital acts as third supervisor. Work at Kings College Dental Institute with the hapTEL virtual learning system has been undertaken with the kind cooperation of Professor Margaret Cox, support for work with dental students by Professor Mark Woolford. Her PhD research includes fine art drawing practice. The art works continue to be made both as a reflection and response to the haptic nature of surgery and anatomy.

Marta Violette Kot is an artist, educator, and doctoral student at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research is based on the activity of doodling. She is currently a faculty member at the Silvermine School of Art, CT, teaches private studio art to students with autism, was recently a visiting artist at the CT Experiential Learning Center and the Family and Children’s Agency (Prevention for Intervention Program), CT. She taught in NYC, CT and Poland. She studied overseas in Krakow, Warsaw, Paris, Venice, and Valletta, privately in the studios of Antoine Camilleri (Malta) and Zbylut Grzywacz (Poland). Some solo shows include: National Museum of Fine Arts in Malta; 80 Washington Sq East Gallery, NYC; Macy Gallery, Teachers College Columbia University; Harlem School of the Arts; Zamek Ujazdowski Center for Contemporary Art Lab, Poland; Legislative Office Building, CT; Central CT State University Special Collections Gallery; City of New York Office of Legal Affairs.

Pedro Cabral lives and works in Lisbon, Portugal, where he was born in 1954. He graduated from ESBAL (Lisbon’s Fine Arts School) in 1978 with a degree in architecture, and has been a practicing architect ever since. He currently works as an architect for the Portuguese Ministry of Health. In addition, He runs the blog BONECOS DE BOLSO (http://www.bonecosdebolso1.blogspot.pt/) and collaborates with URBAN SKETCHERS (http://www.urbansketchers.org/) and URBAN SKETCHERS PORTUGAL (http://urbansketchers-portugal.blogspot.pt/). He is married with two children, a daughter-in-law and a grandson.

Pedro draws, sails and walks.

Graham Price is senior lecturer in art education at the University of Waikato, New Zealand. His undergraduate study of anthropology and art education experience led to a M.Ed thesis focusing on children’s responses to adult artists’ work and a review of the discourses underpinning elementary art education practice. Further post-graduate research interests have spanned investigations into the pedagogies of art and art history in elementary and junior high schools across bicultural settings in New Zealand. Recent team research has explored the interrelationships between art, drama, dance and music education and the wider curriculum amongst elementary teachers. The development of ‘visual methods’ and ‘role’ to elicit research data for educational research with children has been a particular recent interest (Whyte et al, 2013). He has on-going research collaborations with Prof Albano at the University of Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brasil. His own artistic explorations follow a life-long interest in a cappella music, sacred dance and forms of Buddhist calligraphy reinterpreted from jewellery to sculptural scale. This particular research project brings some of those threads together in the context of community dance practices.  grahamp@waikato.ac.nz

Sarah Schnekloth’s practice is motivated by the question of how science, imagination, and the body inform one another through the activity of drawing. By combining the visual languages of biology, geology, and physics into large-scale, mixed-media, and interactive drawings, I create images that speak to the physicality of markmaking, the embodiment of memory, and our interpretation of natural systems and phenomena. These drawings have been shown throughout the US, South Africa, and France; my essays on drawing and embodiment have appeared in the Journal of Visual Culture, Visual Communications Quarterly, and the Manifest International Drawing Annual. She holds an MFA from the University of Wisconsin, and heads the Drawing Program at the University of South Carolina.

Associate Professor, Department of Art, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA schneckloth@gmail.com and www.saraschneckloth.com

Dr Paula Dawson is a Sydney based artist whose work has pioneered holography within Australia and Internationally. Paula has exhibited extensively both internationally and in Australia, with solo and group exhibitions at the National Portrait Gallery, Art Gallery of New South Wales and MIT Museum (USA). Paula believes in imagination and compassion as two of the most precious resources on the planet and her work seeks to expand these in qualitative and quantitative ways.Currently Paula is a lead researcher on the Holoshop research project for the design and evaluation of rapid 3D drawing technology for content creation in holograms and other 3D displays and an Associate Professor at the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales where she teaches painting and drawing.

Nina Samuel is an art and science historian and independent curator based in New York City with a PhD in Art History from Humboldt University, Berlin. Her thesis, entitled “The Shape of Chaos”, investigates visual epistemologies in the field of complex dynamics and drawing as a mode of thinking. After various research positions, among others with the ‘Technical Image’ group at Humboldt University and with the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin, Nina spent the academic year 2011-2012 as Visiting Assistant Professor at the Bard Graduate Center in NYC where she curated The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot: Fractals, Chaos, and the Materiality of Thinking. Nina’s current exhibition project, My Brain Is in My Inkstand: Drawing as Thinking and Process explores techniques of drawing in contemporary art and science and will open at the Cranbrook Art Museum in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, Nov 15, 2013.

Kerry Walton is the Programme Co-ordinator for Textiles: Innovation and Design, School of the Arts, Loughborough University. Kerry is currently developing new practice led Textile work exploring the relationship between drawing and design for Textiles, specifically weaving; this project consolidates a strand of enquiry developing around the themes of drawing/textiles/practice within current research. She recently gave a paper at the Making conference in Norway (Lines of thought: Unpicking the relationship between textiles process and drawing), a paper presentation at the HEA Storyville conference in Brighton around similar themes aligned with educational imperatives, and presented a paper and exhibited work at the Poetics and Praxis, Research Through Design conference at the Baltic centre for contemporary Art, in Newcastle September 2013.

K.Walton@lboro.ac.uk

Picturing Thinking through Drawing on 21/10/2013 at 20:25

The conference is being documented in many ways. Visual scribe Yoon Bahk is joining us again to record presentations in words and pictures. Be prepared to be interviewed and sketched by comic journalist Sharon Rosenzwieg. Reportage artist Julia Midgley is joining us to observe and create a visual narrative of the event. We are also lucky to have the filmmaker Jane Nisselson with us this year to lead a team of social media videographers (Teachers College graduate student volunteers) to document and broadcast the conference in real time.

We would love to have you participate in the collective documentation of this event!

Please contribute your drawings, photos and other observations to our Facebook page and the Macy classroom walls during the conference.

www.facebook.com/drawingandcognition

twitter.com/DrawCogs

Thursday, Oct. 24: Parallel Presentations on 21/10/2013 at 16:24

Parallel Session One: 10.30am– 12 Noon

Rethinking Drawing Research
Room: Macy 445 (painting studio)
Chair: Andrea Kantrowitz

How Might the Teaching and Learning of and with Drawing Provide Rich
Inspiration for Research?
Jack Southern

Comics as a Way of Thinking, Nick Sousanis

2013 A Research Odyssey: The Art Object in Search of New Knowledge, Shaun Belcher

Drawing in a Digital Age
Room: Macy 447
Chair: Joe Graham

Drawing in Holoshop, Paula Dawson

Motion, Light, and Space: Gesture in The Digital Age, Sean Justice & Tree Williams

11 Billion Drawing Crit, Harvey Dingwall

Drawing for Design
Room: Macy 446
Chair: Beatriz Albuquerque-Mendes

Re-purposing Drawing in Textile Design Education, Kerry Walton

Drawing as Design Thinking, Pattie Belle Hastings

Architecting through Freehand Drawing, Raquel Pelayo & Nuno Lacerda

Sketching, Thinking and Communicating
Room: Grace Dodge 449 (down the hall)
Chair: Simon Downs

Sketching At the Speed of Thought: Weaving Expertise Theory With Drawing Automaticity, Jim Dawkins

Interchanges Between Medicine and Drawing Practice, Jenny Wright

The Dreamed Gestures: Discussing A Case Study of Project Communication, Graca Margalhaes

Parallel Session Two: 1.30 pm – 3.00 pm

Drawing as Investigation
Room: Macy 445 (painting studio)
Chair: Nick Sousanis

Drawing as Thinking in Chaos Theory, Nina Samuel

Isomorphology: Drawing Research and Methodology, Gemma Anderson

Embodying Symbiosis: A Philosophy of Mind in Drawing, Amber Struke

Seeing through Sketching
Room: Macy 447
Chair: Jack  Southern

Sketching and Slow Travelling, Pedro Cabral

Sketchbooks and Their Private and Public Dimensions, Elisa Alaluusua

Seeing, More or Less: Drawing as Disposition of Perception, Lynn Imperatore

Gesture and Action
Room: Macy 446
Chair: Beatriz Albuquerque-Mendes

Gesture Affect and The Pursuit of The Authentic, Graham Price

Picturing Actions / Acting Pictures: Performance Methodologies as Drawing Strategies, Joaquim Jorge Marquez & Paulo Luis Almeida

Common Gesture: A Collaborative Drawing Experiment, Sarah Schneckloth

Drawing and Learning
Room: Grace Dodge 449 (down the hall)
Chair: Kerry Walton

Drawn to Discovery: Models for Sketching in Design Education, Louis Netter & Alexander Tibus

Co-Variates of Drawing Ability: Personality and Demographic Factors. The Story So Far…, Howard Riley

Research, through and From Drawing in a Learning Context, Silvia Simoes

Parallel Session Three: 3.20 pm – 4.50 pm

Spontaneity and Invention in Drawing Process
Room: Macy 445 (painting studio)
Chair: Gemma Anderson

Frederick Froebel’s Influences On Drawing Education: Reclaiming Invention and Play in Mark-Making, Courtney Lee Weida

The Process of Doodling, Marta Kot

Point, Mark, Line, Outline: Thinking through the Drawn Line, Joe Graham

Drawing Process in Architectural Thinking
Room: Macy 447
Chair: Becky Chamberlain

Space Empathy: Architectural Spatial Compositions through Drawing Research, David Mrugala

The Digital Dilemma: Product Versus Process in Architectural Education, Claire Hannibal

The Haptics of Copying: John Hejduk and the Axonometric, Ray Lucas

Drawing as Emergence
Room: 446
Chair: Nick Sousanis

Ichnographia, Eirini Boukla

Translations: A Drawing Project and Some Considerations on Tracing, Joao Dos Santos

Emergent Drawing, Simon Downs

Directions on 18/10/2013 at 08:53

Getting Around New York City

https://www.hopstop.com/

http://web.mta.info/apps/

Getting to The Metropolitan Museum

Use the South Entrance, which is to the left of the stairs to the main entrance. This is where the Uris Center for Education is located, and where conference and workshop registration will take place.

map

Getting to Teachers College, Columbia University

Teachers College is located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan on 120th Street between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue and is accessible by various modes of transportation.

map

The subway station serving Teachers College is the 116th Street stop of the IRT Broadway-Seventh Avenue local. The No. 1 subway train (red line) are local trains serving this station. Be sure that you are on (or transfer to) the local line at the 96th Street Station. The express line (No. 2 or No. 3 trains) does not serve Columbia University.

There are subway entrances at Penn Station and the Port Authority Bus Terminal. From Grand Central Station, the Shuttle (S) goes to “Times Square” 42nd Street, offering access to the No. 1 IRT Broadway Local trains going uptown.

Online Resources:
Metropolitan Transportation Authority – information about New York City Transit, Long Island Rail Road, Long Island Bus,Metro-North Railroad as well as metropolitan bridges and tunnels.
New York City Subway Resources – information on current and historical operations.
New York Subway Finder – generates subway directions to any Manhattan address.

Within New York City, five bus routes include a stop at West 120th Street and Broadway (Teachers College): M4 (available from both Grand Central Station and Penn Station), M5, M11, M60 and the M104 (available from the Port Authority Bus Terminal). The fare required is exact change in coins, Metropolitan Transit Authority token or Metrocard.

Online Resources:
Metropolitan Transportation Authority – information about New York City Transit,Long Island Rail Road, Long Island Bus, Metro-North Railroad as well as metropolitan bridges and tunnels



The Henry Hudson Parkway (West Side Highway) in New York City runs parallel to the Hudson River and offers convenient access to Teachers College. The highway can be reached from most of the main routes entering New York City. The nearest major highway link to it is Interstate 95 (I-95).

Whether driving north or south on the Henry Hudson Parkway/West Side Highway, exit at 95th Street. At the first traffic light, turn north (left) onto Riverside Drive; at 120th Street turn east (right) and go two blocks east to the College. The main entrance is located midway between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue, on the north side of West 120th Street.

While West 120th Street offers metered parking on both sides of the street, parking on New York City streets in the Columbia University area is limited.

Nearby off-street parking facilities include:

  • Morningside Garage, 3100 Broadway (at 123rd Street), (212) 864-9877
  • E & B Operating Corp., 137 West 108th Street (between Amsterdam and Columbus Avenues), (212) 865-8315
  • Park Yorkshire Garage, 151 West 108th Street (between Amsterdam and Columbus Avenues), (212) 865-2314
  • Upper Westside Parking Garage, 234 West 108th Street (between Amsterdam Avenue and Broadway), (212)222-8800
  • Riverside Church Garage, 120th Street (between Riverside Drive and Claremont Avenue), (212) 870-6736
  • Evening parking is available at Riverside Church (call (212) 866-1000

Please call garages directly for current prices and reservations.


The subway station serving Teachers College is the 116th Street stop of the IRT Broadway-Seventh Avenue local. The No. 1 subway train (red line) are local trains serving this station. Be sure that you are on (or transfer to) the local line at the 96th Street Station. The express line (No. 2 or No. 3 trains) does not serve Columbia University.

There are subway entrances at Penn Station and the Port Authority Bus Terminal. From Grand Central Station, the Shuttle (S) goes to “Times Square” 42nd Street, offering access to the No. 1 IRT Broadway Local trains going uptown.

Online Resources:
Metropolitan Transportation Authority – information about New York City Transit, Long Island Rail Road, Long Island Bus,Metro-North Railroad as well as metropolitan bridges and tunnels.
New York City Subway Resources – information on current and historical operations.
New York Subway Finder – generates subway directions to any Manhattan address.


Grand Central Terminal, which is located at East 42nd Street and Park Avenue, is the New York City terminus for two commuter trains, MetroNorth and Conrail, as well as some Amtrak trains from Canada and Upstate New York.

Penn Station, at West 34th Street and Seventh Avenue, is the New York City terminus for all other Amtrak service and the Long Island Railroad, New Jersey Transit, and the New Jersey PATH train commuter lines.

Online Resources:
Amtrak
Metropolitan Transportation Authority – information about New York City Transit, Long Island Rail Road, Long Island Bus, Metro-North Railroad as well as metropolitan bridges and tunnels
Long Island Railroad
New Jersey Transit

24 hour drawing by Elisa Alaluusua on 14/10/2013 at 10:20

24h Drawing IV – 22nd to 23rd Oct 2013 by Elisa Alaluusua,
in conjunction with the 2013 Thinking through Drawing conference

there will be a private view, Wednesday 23rd at 5-7pm, Fisher Hall, Horace Mann School, Riverdale

Alaluusua will be completing a durational drawing piece from her series of large-scale site-specific drawings at Horace Mann School, Riverdale. 24h Drawing IV pushes mental and physical boundaries as it is completed over-night and in one go, over a period of 24 hours. Alaluusua is interested in the physicality of mark-making and the negotiated relationship between the drawing and the architecture of the place. Alaluusua lives and works in London where the previous 24h Drawings have been completed. She makes parallels with her drawings to the physical demands of daily life on the reindeer farm where she grew up in Finnish Lapland. Conference participants are invited to visit Horace Mann school and see the drawing in situ. More info from ealaluusua@hotmail.com

Directions to Horace Mann School

Elisa Alaluusua is a part-time PhD researcher at the University of the Arts London and a practicing artist and educator. Originally from a reindeer farm in Finnish Lapland she moved to England first time in 1994. Since 2000 Alaluusua has taught Fine Art at Westminster School which is a highly selective independent school in central London for 14 to 18 year olds. Her practice involves drawing and video works (see www.ealaluusua.com). Since 2009 Alaluusua has been conducting research at the UAL around the topic of “Sketchbooks – the Role of a Sketchbook as Part of Creative Strategies used by Artists and Designers”. She has exhibited internationally since early 1990s. The most recent works include 24h Drawing III, Cafe Gallery, London (Apr13); 24h Drawing II, Pullens Yard, London (Dec12); 24h Drawing I, Westminster School, London (Sept12); Sketchbooks of Michael Sandle –video, Royal Academy of Arts, London (Nov11-Feb12). A forthcoming drawing event during the TTD conference 24h Drawing IV at Horace Mann school, NYC – private view 23rd Oct, 5-7pm.

Drawing Research Network Presenters, Thursday, October 24 on 13/10/2013 at 12:58

Schedule of parallel sessions

Provisional list of confirmed speakers.  Check back for updates.

Amber Stucke, California College of the Arts, Embodying Symbiosis: A Philosophy of Mind in Drawing

Claire Hannibal, Leeds Metropolitan University, The Digital Dilemma: Product versus Process in Architectural Education

Eirini Boukla, University of Leeds

Gavin Renwick, University of Alberta, Drawing and Self-Determination:
Visual Research in the Canadian North

Gemma Anderson, Falmouth University

Graham Price, University of Waikato, Gesture Affect and the Persuit of the Authentic

Harvey Dingwall, Edinburgh University

Jack Southern, University of Gloucestershire, How might the teaching and learning of and with drawing provide rich
inspiration for research?

Jim Dawkins & Jill Pable, Florida State University, Sketching at the Speed of Thought: Weaving Expertise Theory with Drawing Automaticity

João Dos Santos, Caldas da Rainha Polytechnic Institute of Leiria

Joaquim Jorge Marquez & Paulo Luis Almeida, University of Oporto, Picturing Actions / Acting Pictures: Performance Methodologies as Drawing Strategies

Joe Graham, Loughborough University, Can the act of drawing itself be a form of research, and if so, what methods might reveal this particular function of drawing?

Kerry Walton & Faith Kane, Loughborough University, Re-purposing Drawing in Textile Design Education: research and practice shaping pedagogy

Lynn Imperatore, University of the West of England, Seeing, More or Less: Drawing as Disposition of Perception

Nick Sousanis, Teachers College; Comics as a Way of Thinking

Nicola Brunswick & Howard Riley, Swansea Metropolitan University, Co-variates of Drawing Ability: Personality and Demographic Factors. The Story So Far…

Pattie Belle Hastings, Quinnipiac University

Paula Dawson & Masa Takatsuka, Drawing in Holoshop

Pedro Cabral, Urban Sketchers, Sketching and slow travelling

Raquel Pelayo & Nuno Lacerda, University of Oporto, Architecting through freehand drawing

Ray Lucas, Manchester Metropolitan, The haptics of copying: John Hejduk and the axonometric

Sean Justice & Tree Williams, Teachers College, Motion, Light, and Space: Gesture in the Digital Age

Shaun Belcher, Nottingham Trent University, 2013 A Research odyssey: The art object in search of new knowledge

Sílvia Patrícia Moreno Simões, University of Porto, Research, through and from the drawing in learning context

Simon Downs, Loughborough University

Saturday, October 26 @ Teachers College on 11/10/2013 at 17:03

Saturday will find us back at Teachers College, in room Zankel 408, for a series of panel discussions with experts from a range of disciplines. The conference will end on Saturday evening with a reception for the concurrent drawing exhibition in the Macy Gallery at Teachers College, entitled, “Tracing Experience.

9:00 – 9:30 am Registration and Coffee
Zankel 408

9:30- 9:45 Welcome: Olga Hubbard, Art and Art Education Program, Teachers College
Zankel 408

9:45-10:45 Angie Brew, Michelle Fava, Andrea Kantrowitz and Rebecca McGinnis
‘The case for drawing’ and report back from
The Metropolitan Museum drawing workshops.
Zankel 408

10:45 – 11:00    Coffee Break
Macy Gallery

11:00 – 12:20 pm   Panel Discussion:
Externalizing the Creative Process
Zankel 408

with Jonathan Berger, Jill Sigman and Roberto Casati
Chair: Barbara Tversky

12:20 – 1:30 pm Lunch in Macy Gallery

1:30 – 2:50 pm    Panel Discussion:
Drawing as Embodied Experience
Zankel 408

With Monika Weiss, Morgan O’Hara, Sabiha Keskin, Hayal Uzun, Mualla Oya Sakiroglu

Chair: Angie Brew

2:50 – 3:10 pm Break
Macy Gallery

3:10 – 4:30 pm Panel Discussion:
Drawing to Learn
Zankel 408

With Seymour Simmons, Andrea Kantrowitz, Cyra Levenson,
Simon Betts, and Kim Sloane
Chair: Michelle Fava

4:30 – 4:50 pm Open mike
Zankel 408

4:50 – 5:00 pm Concluding remarks
Zankel 408

5:00 – 7:00 pm “Tracing Experience,” Macy Gallery Reception
Including Drawn to Sound, a musical and drawn performance with Morgan O’HaraGian Luigi Diana, Ben Gerstein and Mike Pride

Friday, October 25 @ The Metropolitan Museum on 11/10/2013 at 16:59

The Friday sessions will be held in the galleries and Uris Education Center atThe Metropolitan Museum of Art. The day will consist primarily of drawing workshops, conducted by museum staff and invited guests, which will engage participants in the museum spaces and collections in novel ways. There will be a 25 person limit to each workshop, so please sign up at the registration desk to ensure a place in your chosen session.

A mid-day plenary session, “Drawing as a tool for thought,” will highlight key issues in drawing pedagogy, research and practice.

9:30 – 10:00 am Registration and Coffee
Ruth & Harold D. Uris Center for Education
Ground floor. South Entrance.

10:00 am – 12:00 pm Drawing workshops

Led by members of The Metropolitan Museum education department. All levels welcome. Materials will be provided.

1. Sketch to Learn
William Crow/Claire Moore; Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall

Explore ways gallery-based sketching can draw attention to specific features of art objects and foster thinking skills such as evidence-based reasoning. During the session you will look closely at works of art from a range of collection areas,   participate in several guided drawing activities, and reflect on ways the various approaches shaped your observations and insights about each work of art.

2. Seeing through Drawing
Pamela Lawton; North Classroom

Break your own drawing habits! Experiment with drawing through touch and verbal description using non-traditional materials and methods. Enhance your own kinesthetic and spatial awareness as you make drawings inspired by works of art in the galleries of the Metropolitan Museum. You’ll think differently about the process of drawing after you experience some of the techniques used in the Met’s “Seeing Through Drawing” class for adults who are blind or partially sighted.

3. Drawing Experimentations
Michelle Hagewood, Jessica Houston; Studio, Uris Center for Education

What are the potentials for how we define drawing? Based in the Met’s studios and galleries, and following the lead of artists such as William Kentridge, this workshop will explore the role of materials, ephemerality, time, and transformation in drawing. Participants will be led through a series of activities and challenges in order to address the question: “What is drawing and why do we do it?” All levels welcome; materials will be provided.

4. Drawing as Investigation: Sketchbooks
Jackie Terrassa; Met’s Print Study Room

Partially taking place in the Met’s Drawings and Prints Study Room, participants will examine examples of 18th and 19th century sketchbooks created by artists and designers and what they reveal about the various ways they used drawing as a mode of investigation: to research natural phenomena, collect and organize ideas, capture ephemeral moments, make sense of form, or communicate what was “on their mind.” Participants will also draw in the galleries, using their own sketchbooks as thought-collectors as they draw from the collections. A final discussion will wrap up the session.

5. Extended Observation through Drawing
Emily Blumenthal and Monica Marilo; Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall

Slow down and spend time with works of art using drawing as a tool for looking closely and forming a deeper understanding. Participants will consider how extended sketching encourages critical analysis and personal connections with works of art.  This gallery experience will include group discussion, sketching from original works of art, independent exploration, and reflection.  All levels welcome; sketching materials will be provided.

6. Drawing Language
Maya Valladares; Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall

Investigate the marks that formed some of the first systems of written communication.  Participants will explore the collections through sketching/writing and discuss how drawing became a system to record memories or communicate detailed information across space and time. We will also look at how some contemporary artists have used text in their work to complicate or question the idea of communication, and test out some of their techniques first hand.

1:15 – 2:45 pm Plenary: Drawing as a tool for thought

with Vinod Goel, neuroscientist, and Barbara Tversky, cognitive psychologist.

Also featuring WWW Drawing Workshop, a documentary which records 30 students creating three vast drawings over a weekend at the Stuckeman School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, Penn State University. Jane Nisselson, director; Janet Abrams, producer; and Mehrdad Hadighi, department head and organizer, will be present to discuss this project.

2:45 – 3:15 pm Break

3:30 – 6:30 pm Drawing Workshops in the galleries
Participants will have the opportunity to attend two of seven workshops, presented by invited guests. Each workshop will be offered in both sessions. (please sign up for workshops beforehand)

3:30 – 4:45 pm First series of workshops

4:45 – 5:15 pm Coffee Break

5:15 – 6:30 pm Second series of workshops

1. Graphic Notations – Alarm Will Sound
Courtney Orlando, Violin; Michael Clayville, Trombone Jason Price, Trumpet; Erin Lesser, Flute; Melanesia Gallery

Musicians from Alarm Will Sound will discuss intersections between visual shapes and aural gestures. Elements such as shape, texture, density, color, contrast, interaction and duration/length are commonalities between drawing and musical notation. The musicians will work with the participants to interpret graphic notation and create graphic notation that inspires sound. Audience participation required.

2. Collaborative Hand-Drawn Animation Workshop
Sara Schneckloth; Temple of Dendur

This workshop gives participants and Museum patrons the opportunity to take part in creating a hand-drawn animated video that conveys the experience of circumnavigating the Temple of Dendur in the Sackler Wing. Any drawing style can be used to capture each person’s unique view and visual experience of the Temple, ranging from quick interpretive gestures to longer, more detailed, 9 architectural studies. This collaborative drawing process will result in hundreds of unique drawings that combine into a single video piece that will be shown beyond the event.

3. Other Wise: Drawing Life
Angie Brew, Natasha Freedman, and Viyky Turnbull; Roman Court

By focusing on movements of the body the session will explore movements of looking and drawing, our perception of rhythm and time in a still image, and the tuning of the eye, hand and mind for drawing life. We will explore the relationship between the drawer, the viewer and the drawing, investigating action, inaction and reaction in a frame, and the impact of drawing on perception. Brew teaches slow-looking and a fine-tuning of the body for observational drawing. Turnbull and Freedman combine physical movement work, drawing and making to enliven our understanding of what we see.

4. Seeing and Moving, Moving and Seeing: A workshop about movement and the visual field
Jill Sigman; Petrie Court

How are seeing and moving related? This workshop will deal with the symbiotic relationship between moving and seeing. In a world that is saturated with image and technological/perceptual devices, we will go back to the most fundamental device for seeing: the eyes. We will explore how our movements can engender a cinematic experience of sight, working with cinematic concepts such as zooms, pans, and cuts, and conversely, we will investigate how our visual experiences can lead to new movement patterns and impulses. No previous experience with movement or video is required. Participants must only be open-minded, willing to move in public, supportive of a group atmosphere, and mindful of others in their environment.

5. Making mine my MET museum
Teresa Fonseca / Raquel Pelayo; Engelhard Court

We often tend to forget that museums, without users, are not museums. Making mine my MET museum intends to switch this attitude to an art producer’s state of mind, one’s presence inside the building becomes a part of the museum. The experience will evolve the intuitive, intellectual and intentional properties that underlie the act and expression of drawing in architectural space. Our sensitive body will become an integrated object of display: it becomes the museum itself. Feeling the space by placing yourself inside, adds to the experience and the concept of display: the space that runs from doors to stairs, corridors and rooms, walls, windows and ceilings to floors and, of course, to a painting, a sculpture or a chair. It also demands you to read distances and measures, in order to sense the space.

6. Exploring Connections between Art and Medicine: Using Drawing as a Tool for Enhanced Observation

Anna Willieme; New European Paintings Galleries, 1250-1800

We will investigate how drawing can assist us in seeing and observing more while exploring its potential as a tool for increased observational skills in medicine.

The workshop will provide participants with a series of hands-on drawing exercises based on selected art works from the museum’s collection. Such exercises will offer strategies to further access sensory data as well as open up avenues for increased creativity and communication. Art experience is welcome but not necessary.

7. Drawing as a Thinking Process: What materials and techniques tell us.
Marjorie Shelley; Studio, Uris Center for Education

Discover what conservation research can tell us about the varied purposes of drawings, the thought processes of artists, and the ways in which artists extended the possibilities and limitations of their materials. Participants will examine original drawings by Rembrandt, Van Gogh, Sargent and others from the Met’s collection in the Museum’s Paper Conservation Department.

6:30 – 7:00 pm   Break

7:00 – 8:00 pm

John Tchalenko’s Capturing Life
Film screening and discussion

This documentary is based on a series of studies of artists drawing from life, including eyetracker studies and and MRI brain scan investigations carried out by researcher John Tchalenko (University of the Arts London), neuroscientist Chris Miall (University of Birmingham) and artist Humphrey Ocean RA, whose collaboration started in 1999 with “The Painter’s Eye Movements” at the National Portrait Gallery London. The film also looks at more recent projects, including drawings by Thea, Tchalenko’s 2ó year old grandaughter, the sculptor Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) and the illustrator Alexis Deacon.

Thursday, October 24, @ Teachers College on 11/10/2013 at 16:53

Thursday is devoted to parallel presentations by artists and researchers from the Drawing Research Network, followed by drawing performances in the evening and an opportunity to view the ‘Tracing Experience’ exhibition in the Macy Gallery.

Click here for the detailed schedule of parallel sessions

8:30 -9:30 Registration
Millbank Chapel, Ground Floor, Zankel Hall

9:30-10:30 Welcome
Millbank Chapel, Ground Floor, Zankel Hall

Tara Geer: Drawing Exercise
Simon Downs, the Drawing Research Network and Loughborough University
Andrea Kantrowitz, Angela Brew and Michelle Fava, Thinking through Drawing,

10:30-12pm Parallel DRN presentations
Fourth floor; Macy 445, Macy 446, Macy 447; Grace Dodge Hall 449

12-1pm Lunch (at TC, Grace Dodge Café, ground floor, Grace Dodge Hall, and on your own)

1-3:00 pm    Parallel DRN presentations
Fourth floor; Macy 445, Macy 446, Macy 447; Grace Dodge Hall 449

3:00 – 3:20 pm Break
Macy Gallery, 4th floor

3:20-4:40  Parallel DRN presentations
Fourth floor; Macy 445, Macy 446, Macy 447; Grace Dodge Hall 449

4:40 – 5:00 pm Concluding Remarks, Macy Gallery

5:00 – 7pm Drawing performances in the Macy Gallery

EVENING PERFORMANCES

Aletheia, ephemeral installation/performance

Monika Weiss
As a systematic inquiry into the relationships between history, public space and the spaces around the body, Monika Weiss’ work continues to address the performative act of drawing as related to speech, trace, erasure and disappearance. Aletheia belongs to an ongoing series of performative and interactive installations in which Weiss evokes ancient rituals of lamentation and considers aspects of public memory and amnesia as reflected within the physical and political space of the City.

(Im)mediate Traces
Chris Moffet (NYC), Jaanika Peerna (Berlin)
A mediation between two drawers, on different continents, in series or in “the lag” of real time. Establishing (im)mediacy, drawing traces a moving, relational and unfolding practice. The twin mediations of drawing and intercontinental communications delay/alter/interrupt the possibility of an immediate event, while also informing and bringing distant gestures into immediate, attentive, unfolding contact.

Presentations from 2012 on 10/10/2013 at 21:49

Judith Burton’s keynote address: catching things that are out of reach from Thinking through Drawing on Vimeo.

Barbara Tversky: Visualising the Invisible from Thinking through Drawing on Vimeo.

PhilippaLyon: Collaborative drawing across disciplines from Thinking through Drawing on Vimeo.

Jill Journeaux & John Burns: The body redrawn from Thinking through Drawing on Vimeo.

Eddie Norman: Modelling and designerly thinking from Thinking through Drawing on Vimeo.

Thinking through Drawing 2013 Presenters on 09/10/2013 at 09:53

Janet Abrams, Alarm Will Sound,Yoon Bahk, Jonathan Berger,Simon Betts, Angie Brew, Roberto Casati, Simon Downs, Michelle Fava, Natasha Freedman, Tara Geer,Vinod Goel, Mehrdad Hadighi, Andrea Kantrowitz, Sabiha Keskin, Cyra Levenson, Rebecca McGinnis, Julia Midgley, Chris Moffett, Jane Nisselson, Morgan O’Hara, Jaanika Peerna, Sharon Rosenzweig, Sara Schneckloth, Seymour Simmons, Marjorie Shelley, Jill Sigman, Kim Sloane, John Tchalenko, Victoria Turnbull, Barbara Tversky,Monika Weiss,Anna Willieme,

Janet Abrams is a visual artist and writer, who produced the WWW Drawing Project, including the video that will be shown at the Thinking through Drawing symposium, as Special Projects Director for the Stuckeman School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at Penn State University, in 2012-13.

Alarm Will Sound is a 20-member ensemble dedicated to the creation, performance, and recording of today’s music. It is an advocate for innovative work by established and emerging composers, especially works that incorporate theatrical and multimedia elements by choreographers, visual artists, designers, and directors. It fosters the education and professional development of young musicians through residencies, master classes, readings and workshops. With the goal of cultivating a diverse and sophisticated audience, the ensemble brings intelligence and a sense of adventure to the rich variety of musical expression in the contemporary world. Alarm Will Sound will be artists in residence at the Met in the 2013-14 season. The residency will feature four performances, including site-specific collaborations with Kate Soper, Nigel Maister, and John Heginbotham Dance that will explore and exploit various gallery spaces. There will also be a series of residency activities throughout the year, when museum patrons can encounter contemporary music in relationship to the Met’s collection.

Yoon Bahk is a designer and an educator in London who specializes in design thinking and visual scribing. A native of South Korea, Yoon spent a good portion of her formative years in the US and UK. She was trained as an industrial designer at KAIST (2006) in South Korea and received her Masters from the Royal College of Art and Imperial College London in Innovation Design Engineering (2008). Her background and education allows her to be not only bilingual but also multicultural and interdisciplinary enabling her to weave between the social spaces between cultures, disciplines including design and engineering, and commercial and academic worlds. In 2011, Yoon set up Studio Jammo Ltd. She has worked for companies such as Unilever, Pepsico, Barry Callebaut, LG and etc. Yoon has always been passionate about doodling and this had led her to a career in graphic facilitation as part of Studio Jammo’s main activity. After meandering through various creative careers, in 2012 Yoon returned to the Royal College of Art, as a tutor in IDE leading the 1st year of the MA course and running various workshops around the world using collaborative learning and design methods.

Jonathan Berger’s “dissonant but supple” (New York Times) compositions integrate science and human experience, i.e., what does a cancer cell or golf swing sound like? And why does a song make us cry? Berger is the Denning Family Provostial Professor in Music at Stanford University, where he teaches composition, music theory, and cognition at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He was the founding co-director of the Stanford Institute for Creativity and the Arts (SICA, now the Stanford Arts Institute) and founding director of Yale University’s Center for Studies in Music Technology. Referred to as “lush and inviting” by the San Francisco Chronicle, Berger’s music ranges from vocal, orchestral, and chamber works to electroacoustic constructions. He was featured as composer-in-residence at Spoleto Festival USA (2010) with a version of the harrowing and chilling Theotokia (written for Dawn Upshaw), based on Berger’s recent research into auditory hallucinations. His chamber opera Visitations premiered in April, and Livia Sohn’s performance of his violin concerto, Jiyeh, paired with that of Benjamin Britten, was released in June on Harmonia Mundi’s Eloquentia label

Simon Betts is currently Dean of College Wimbledon College of Art. He studied painting at Sheffield Polytechinic and later completed his MA in painting at Chelsea College of Art & Design. He worked in further education for a number of years as course director foundation at Kensington & Chelsea College London, before becoming course leader foundation at Wimbledon in 2003. His drawing research interest is centered on drawing pedagogy and developing courses that promote new approaches to teaching and learning for drawing across disciplines. He co-authored with Professor Stephen Farthing and Kelly Chorpening the Drawing qualifications for the University of the Arts London. He recently led a team to develop the newly validated cross disciplinary MA Drawing course which, based at Wimbledon College of Art, begins this academic year. He has been an external examiner at a number of Colleges in the UK, and in 2005 was a foundation course consultant at the Shanghai Institute of Visual Art, Fu Dan University, China. He has recently been offered an International Visiting Fellowship by RMIT Melbourne, Australia, to work with their Pharmacutetical and Chemistry Faculty to develop on-line drawing modules to support learning in the sciences. As a painter he has exhibited widely in the UK and Europe. Group shows include: perpetuum mobile The Gallery at APT London,(2008), The John Moores Liverpool 19 (1995), Kunstbrucke 2, galerie Parterre, Berlin Germany. Solo shows included Radical surface, De Ploeghis Gallery Gronningen, The Netherlands. Betts also selected and Curated OUTBOUND 1 & 2, two residencies and exhibitions of 6 students from 5 London art colleges at Richter Werkatelier, Den Helder, The Netherlands in 2008. The working title for Simon’s presentation is: The Purpose of Drawing; New approaches for teaching across disciplines.

Angie Brew is a drawing teacher and practitioner, currently researching enactive observational drawing methods and pedagogy for her doctorate. Her art practice explores secular approaches to death, and drawing for well-being. She leads a community project Drawing Growthin Brixton, London and teaches privately. She also works for ArtsExpress, a community arts education charity. She founded and directsThinking through Drawing, International Drawing and Cognition Research and 123 Draw with Michelle Fava and Andrea Kantrowitz.


Roberto Casati is a tenured senior researcher with the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS-EHESS-ENS). Based in Paris, France, he has worked on various research projects in philosophy and the cognitive sciences, and has taught or been a research fellow at several universities, among which the State University of New York at Buffalo, the University IUAV-Venice, the University of Turin, and Columbia University. His books, some of which have been translated in many languages, include Holes and other superficialities (MIT Press 1994, with Achille Varzi), La philosophie du son (Philosophy of Sound, with J. Dokic, 1994), The Shadow Club (Knopf 2002), and Contre le colonialisme numérique (Albin Michel 2013). http://www.shadowes.org

Simon Downs studied illustration (of a particularly traditional school). The evolution of the computer aided design sphere caused him to rethink this traditional practice. In turn he became a digital illustrator, digital animator, interaction and multimedia designer and editorial designer. He worked in London, designing for the finance and publishing sectors. In the year 2000 he became a university lecturer, which caused another round of reflection, a process which continued in 2003 when he joined Loughborough University as a lecturer and design researcher. Simon has been an editor with the journal TRACEY since 2003, founded the political visual culture journal The Poster with Intellect Books in 2009 (as Lead Editor), wrote the book The Graphic Communication Handbook in 2011 for Routledge (in which year he also won the Loughborough University Lecturer of the Year award). He writes on visual communication systems (including drawing), is a Director of the Drawing Research Network and is a trades union representative for the UCU union.

Michelle Fava is a visual artist, teacher and researcher based at Loughborough University where she lectures in Fine Art, and is a member of the Design Education Research Group. She holds an MA in Contemporary Visual Arts from Falmouth University (2005). Her current doctoral research investigates the cognitive functions underpinning drawing, and the contemporary educational relevance of observational practices. Michelle has worked with UK schools and colleges to innovate curricula and teaching methods, and foster communities for pedagogic research and innovation. In 2011, together with Angie Brew and Andrea Kantrowitz, she established 123 Draw, the International Drawing and Cognition Research Group, and the Thinking through Drawing symposium series. 123 Draw are currently editing a forthcoming publication Drawing in STEAM and a special issue of TRACEY, the journal of drawing and visualization research.

Natasha Freedman is a creative director working across the arts sector. She directed Complicite’s research and education programme for many years and worked closely with the Laboratoire d’Etude du Mouvement, investigating the relationships between form, the body, colour and space. She has delivered workshops on ‘active looking’ at the National Gallery for over 9 years focusing on detailed observation of the movement and narratives of the body in space and in the frame to deepen engagement with paintings in the collection and in temporary exhibitions. She has delivered projects for the RCA, Tate (adult programme) and Central St Martin’s (post graduate animation) and directed learning and engagement programmes for the Royal Academy of Arts and the Institute of Making. She is currently Director of Learning and Engagement for The Mosaic Rooms.


Vinod Goel originally trained as an architect. However, unable to develop the skills to sketch, draw and visualize in three dimensions, and mesmerized by several books by Nicholas Negroponte, he stepped outside of the field to try and figure out the relationship between mind and design. He eventually ended up at Berkeley where he studied philosophy, computer science, and psychology and completed an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in cognitive science. Thereafter he completed a postdoc at the NIH in cognitive neuroscience. Since then has been a professor of cognitive neuroscience at York University in Toronto, and also held visiting posts at University College London, the University of Aberdeen, the University of Hull, University of Sussex, University of Queensland, le Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France), and the Max Planck Institute (Berlin). His main research interests are the cognitive and neural basis of real-world reasoning and problem-solving (particularly design).

Tara Geer got her BA from Columbia University with a double major in Art and Art History, she graduated Magna Cum Laude & Phi Beta Kappa. She went back to Columbia with a Teaching Fellowship to get a MFA. She has been drawing and teaching drawing for the nearly 2 decades since. She has also worked at WNYC, the NY public radio station, writing and producing culture pieces for “Morning Edition,” “Studio 360,” Leonard Lopate and other national radio shows. She taught art in the in every borough of NYC, every age, in public and private school, frequently using Visual Teaching Strategies. Recently she has been drawing and teaching private classes out of her studio in Harlem and teaching drawing classes at Columbia. The private students range from advanced drawers working on specific projects, professionals in the arts having blocks, to kids with delays working on perceptual challenges. She has been to several residencies at MacDowell and Denniston Hill and shows her work in galleries, including Tibor de Nagy, The Drawing Center registry and the Four Seasons Hotel in Wyoming. She will have a solo show at the Outpost this winter. She received the Loius Sudler Prize for excellence in the Arts and the Joan Sovern prize.

Mehrdad Hadighi completed his post-professional studies at Cornell University and holds a professional degree in architecture and a degree in studio art from the University of Maryland. His scholarly work focuses on drawing parallels between 20th century art, theory and criticism and the constructive principles of architecture. Hadighi’s premiated design competition entries include the Studentenheim + Bauernmarkt, Glockengasse, Public Space in the New American City, Atlanta, Berlin Alexanderplatz Design Competition, Austrian Cultural Institute in Manhattan, and the Peace Garden Design Competition. He has produced site specific installations for galleries in Washington, DC, Buffalo, Ithaca and New York City, and has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York Foundation for the Arts. The Architectural League of New York selected Hadighi as one of the six notable “Young Architects” in their “Young Architects Forum” series. Hadighi has been selected as one of “25 most intriguing, innovative and intrepid architects, from all over the world” by Wallpaper* magazine; and as one of “10 Young Firms Reshaping the Globe” by the Architectural Record magazine in their Design Vanguard issue. His work is the subject of a monograph by SHARESTAN, and his most recent work has been featured in the following books: Conversions; Small Structures, Green Architecture; Xs Green: Big Ideas, Small Buildings; Extensions and Renovations; Up, Down, Across: Domestic Extensions; House Plus, New House Design; and Architecture In Detail.


Andrea Kantrowitz is an artist, teacher and doctoral candidate at Teacher’s College, Columbia University, where she is doing research on the cognitive dimensions of contemporary artists’ drawing practices. She holds a B.A in Art and Cognition from Harvard University and a MFA in Painting from Yale, teaches foundation drawing at Pratt Institute, and is an adjunct professor in the graduate program in art education at the College of New Rochelle. She has also worked for many years as a teaching artist in the New York City public schools have been involved in multiple local and national research projects. Her research examines the cognitive interactions underlying contemporary artists’ drawing practices. Her own art work has been exhibited nationally and is represented by Kenise Barnes Fine Art in Larchmont NY.


Sabiha Keskin was born in 1955 in Tekirdag, Turkey. In 1974, she graduated from Istanbul Robert College which was considered to provide the best American education in Turkey. She was awarded with Fulbright and TUBITAK grants. She had acceptances from Stanford and Rochester Universities. She preferred to have a medical career in Turkey. In 1980, Keskin was graduated from the Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty in Istanbul Turkey. In 1986 she had her Pediatrics, and in 2002 her Pediatric Neurology expertise at the same Faculty.
In 1992, at the Medical College of Wisconsin in the U.S.A, in addition to her studies on epilepsy, she took part in the studies on the intrauterine cocaine-exposed infant’s behavior. In 2000, she took A.B.A. courses at the Florida Technical Institute. She became one of the leading scientific figures in her country on child development regarding mother-child behavior. She introduced an intervention for a secure mother-child attachment relationship at an International Scientific Congresses.
Dr Keskin is the author of 13 books on child development that are best-seller sources of the Turkish mothers nationwide as well as doctors and trainers. One of the books is on the development of children’s drawings. She gave consulting to several sources among which Britannica Discovery Library For Children, Kindergarten Journals, Child theaters, Turkish animated film scenarios.


Cyra Levenson, Ed.M., is Associate Curator of Education at the Yale Center for British Art. Prior to Yale, Ms. Levenson held positions at the Seattle Art Museum and the Rubin Museum of Art focused on gallery interpretation. She has worked closely with schools and teachers throughout her career and has conducted research and published on the topic of visual literacy and creativity in museum practice. Ms. Levenson is also the co-curator of the upcoming exhibition, Figures of Empire: Slavery and Portraiture in Atlantic Britain and is author of the article, “Re-presenting Slavery: Underserved Questions in Museum Collections”. Ms. Levenson has a degree in Art Education from Teachers College, Columbia University and has been working in the field of museum education for 15 years.


Rebecca McGinnis is the Museum Educator overseeing Access and Community Programs at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. She and her colleagues are recognized internationally for their pioneering programs for visitors with disabilities. With artist-educators Pamela Lawton and Deborah Lutz she developed Thinking Through Drawing, a drawing class for adults who are blind or partially sighted, offered monthly since 2008. A display of work from the class is currently on view in the Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education at the Met. In 2011 she received the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Award for Excellence in Accessibility Leadership and the American Council of the Blind Achievement Award in Audio Description for Museums. Her publications include Art and the Alphabet: A Tactile Experience (with Ileana Sanchez), an innovative children’s book combining braille, tactile pictures, and images of works of art from the Metropolitan Museum; “Enabling Education: Including People with Disabilities in Art Museum Programming” in From Periphery to Center: Art Museum Education in the 21st Century, ed. Pat Villenueve, National Art Education Association, 2007; “Developing Museum Programs for People with Autism” in Understanding Students with Autism through Art, ed. Beverly Levett Gerber and Julia Kellman, National Art Education Association, 2010; “Learning in Art Museums: Cognition and Visual Impairment” in Journal of the Sciences and Arts, Mita Society for the Sciences and Arts, Keio University, Tokyo, number 14, 2010; and “Islands of Stimulation: Perspectives on the Museum Experience, Present and Future” in The Multisensory Museum: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Touch, Sound, Smell, Memory, and Space, ed. Nina Levent and Alvaro Pascual Leone, AltaMira Press, forthcoming. Rebecca is co-convenor with Art Beyond Sight of the bi-annual Multimodal Approaches to Learning conference (2005, 2007, 2009, 2012). She is an adjunct lecturer in the Museum Studies MA Program at Johns Hopkins University, teaching Accessibility in the Museum, a course she developed. She co-chaired the New York Museum Access Consortium from 2000-2012. Her international experience includes directing access audits and training for over fifty museums in the United Kingdom and in the United States, and major collaborations with the British Museum and National Portrait Gallery in London. Rebecca has worked at the Royal National Institute for the Blind and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. In addition to MA degrees in History of Art (NYU) and Museum Studies (University of Leicester), she is a doctoral candidate in Cognitive Psychology pursuing research relating to visual impairment and mental imagery at Teachers’ College, Columbia University.


Julia Midgley is Reader in Documentary Drawing at Liverpool School Art & Design. She practices as as a reportage and documentary artist. Her work serves as a narrative, documentary and archive of 21st century life with a focus on war artists and surgery. Her drawings of 20th Century medicine were exhibited at The Royal College of Surgeons. Julia was the DLA Piper Artist in Residence for the new Art & Design Academy at Liverpool John Moores University. Other residencies and commissions included the Royal Liverpool University Hospital Trust; the Royal Liverpoool & Broadgreen University Hospital; Blackpool Pleasure Beach; Granada Television; Arts Council Art 04 conference and the Stonehenge Riverside Project. More recently she has been making drawings of delegates talking about drawing at drawing conferences!
Over decades of practice Julia’s drawings tell of personal journeys. She has drawn a kidney transplant from mother to son; witnessed the excavation of mutilated sacrificial skeletons at Stonehenge; been surrounded by Vikings at Blackpool Pleasure Beach, and stood amongst banks of astonished photographers at Bechers Brook waiting for horses to thunder by.
web.me.com/barbara.griffin/sketchlincoln/julia_midgley.html


Chris Moffett is a philosopher of educational aesthetics and a founding member of ARE (aestheticrelationalexercises.com) exploring the moving traces of embodied practice. Currently in New York City, he works with the aesthetics of urban and academic ambulations. He moves with others.

Jane Nisselson is the founder of the film production studio Virtual Beauty, whose Webby-nominated short films focus on the intersection of design, science, and engineering. She received her M.S. from the MIT Media Lab. Short documentaries include online video series for the Corning Museum of Glass and Popular Mechanics. Recent projects include a National Science Foundation funded viral video “Explaining Diagrams.” The WWW Drawing workshop video, directed by Jane Nisselson, documents 30 architecture and landscape architecture students creating three vast hand-drawings over a weekend at the Stuckeman School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, Penn State University. Architects Michael Webb, Mark West, and James Wines led the group drawing sessions. The event was organized by Mehrdad Hadighi, Department Head, Professor, and Stuckeman Chair of Integrative Design and Janet Abrams, Director of Special Projects.


Morgan O’Hara was raised in post-war Japan. Her practice researches the vital movement of living beings through drawing. In 1989 she began working in international performance art festivals, did her first site specific wall drawings and began the practice of aikido, a Japanese martial art. O’Hara lives in New York and works internationally. She teaches master classes in drawing and the psychology of creativity in international institutions. Important residencies include MacDowell Colony, New Hampshire; Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Macau Museum of Art, China; Nha San Studio Hanoi, New Space Arts Foundation Hue, and Zero Space Saigon,Vietnam; Aomori Contemporary Art Center, Japan; Guapamacataro, Michoacan, Mexico. Recipient of fellowships from Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Gottleib Foundation, Foundation for Contemporary Arts, among others. Selected public collections include: National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, California; Arkansas Art Center, Little Rock, Arkansas; Weatherspoon Gallery, Greensboro, North Carolina; Hood Museum of Art, New Hampshire; Czech National Gallery, Prague; Moravian Gallery, Brno, Czech Republic; Macau Art Museum, Macau, China; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. Her permanent site specific wall drawings can be found in Macau, China; Kobe, Japan and Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Publications include five volumes of LIVE TRANSMISSION drawings.


Jaanika Peerna is an Estonian-born artist living and working near New York since 1998, and currently in Berlin. Her work engages with transitions in light, air, water and often involves collaborative processes with designers, dancers, and musicians.


Sharon Rosenzweig is an investigative cartoonist, looking at and listening to people involved in their pursuits, including Occupy Wall Street and backyard chickens. She was trained as a painter/printmaker, at Indiana University, The Art Students’ League, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.Previously, in collaboration with her husband, the comedian Aaron Freeman, she created The Comic Torah, a graphic re-imagining of the Hebrew Bible, published by Ben Yehuda Press.


Sara Schneckloth‘s studio practice is motivated by the question of how science, imagination, and the body inform one another through the activity of drawing. Schneckloth has shown in over fifty exhibitions throughout the US, South Africa, and France, including the Wisconsin Triennial, the Columbus Biennial, Drawing Beyond at the Princeton Arts Council, the Florida Experimental Film Festival, Soho20 Chelsea, and in numerous university galleries.  Her essays on drawing and embodiment have appeared in the Journal of Visual Culture, Visual Communications Quarterly, and the Manifest International Drawing Annual.  Schneckloth holds an MFA from the University of Wisconsin – Madison, and has lived and worked in Iowa, Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, and Cape Town, South Africa, and Columbia, SC.  She is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Art at the University of South Carolina.  Images of her work can be found at
www.saraschneckloth.com.


Marjorie Shelley is the Sherman Fairchild Conservator in Charge of the Museum’s Sherman Fairchild Center for Works on Paper and Photograph Conservation.


Jill Sigman asks questions through the medium of the body. Trained in classical ballet, contemporary dance, art history, and analytic philosophy, Sigman has been making dances and performance installations since the early 90s. She is Artistic Director of jill sigman/thinkdance which she founded in 1998, the same year she received her Ph.D. in philosophy from Princeton University. Sigman is based in New York City and in 2012 has been a Fellow at the Center for Creative Research at NYU and a Visiting Artist at Wesleyan University. She is currently at work on The Hut Project, an exploration of issues around waste, sustainability, and real estate through the creation of a series of site-specific structures made of found materials. www.thinkdance.org

Seymour Simmons is an Associate Professor in the Department of Fine Art at Winthrop University, Rock Hill, South Carolina, where he coordinates the Undergraduate Art Education program and teaches courses in both art education and studio art, e.g., drawing and figure drawing. He has a B.F.A. in Printmaking from Colorado State University, as well as Masters and Doctorate degrees in Education from Harvard University where his degree was in Philosophy of Education. Prior to coming to Winthrop, he taught at Massachusetts College of Art and worked as a researcher at Harvard ProjectZero with Dr. Howard Gardner. http://www.seymoursimmons.com/


Kim Sloane is currently the Acting Chair of Foundation at Pratt Institute where he had taught the Foundation Drawing course for some fifteen years. Mr. Sloane is also a practicing artist who has shown widely in New York, and has twice received awards for his drawing at the National Academy Museum’s biannual exhibitions. He is a graduate of Yale College and received his MFA from the Parsons School of Design.

John Tchalenko graduated in Geology, continued with a PhD in Civil Engineering and published extensively in seismotectonics and earthquakes. He became documentary film director for arts and science films, producing essentially for Channel4, BBC2 and FR3.  In 2000, he was made Reader in Drawing and Cognition at the University of the Arts London. Presently, John is Emeritus Researcher at Birmingham University U.K. His interest in Cognition started with the Painter’s Eye Movements, a Wellcome Trust initiative developed with collaborators Humphrey Ocean, painter, Chris Miall, psychologist (Oxford University) and Robert Solso, psychologist (University of Nevada).  Eye-tracking and brain scanning techniques were used for the first time to investigate the creative drawing process. Results were presented in the peer-reviewed literature and at the National Portrait Gallery in 1999.  Since then John has extended the study to include Human-Computer interfaces for the disabled (Eyemouse Project), visual search in medical imaging (Eye Control Project with Imperial College Computing Dept) and Laparoscopic surgery (How do you Look? with St Mary’s Hospital).  Results were presented in the scientific literature and in theNeedle in a Haystack display at the Royal Society 2002 Summer Show and at the Royal Academy of Arts show 2004.  How Do You Look? comparing eye-hand co-ordination in painters and laparoscopic surgeons opened at the Dulwich Picture Gallery, toured the U.K. to end at the Royal College of Surgeons in December 2006. Latest publications include: Eye-hand strategies in copying complex lines (2009) in Vision Research 45, and The Gaze-Shift Strategy in Drawing (forthcoming) in Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts.

Victoria Turnbull is an artist based in London, whose work is concerned with the close examination of objects. Her 154 page work ‘The Drawn Inventory of all the Objects in my Studio’ won the Islington Exhibits artist award in 2012 and her work has been commissioned by the Whitechapel Gallery, Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Building Exploratory. Viyki leads practical workshops in drawing at the National Portrait Gallery, the Camden Arts Centre and RIBA. She is also a freelance lecturer at the National Gallery and has co-written ‘The Keys to Creativity’ (2011) a drawing resource for the National Gallery, as well as education resources for several exhibitions at the Camden Arts Centre including ‘Looking with Viyki Turnbull: Jim Hodges and Breda Beban (2010) and for Wilhelm Sasnal’s painting exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery (2011).


Barbara Tversky is a cognitive psychologist, currently Professor of Psychology at Columbia Teachers College and Professor Emerita at Stanford University. She has long been interested in visual and spatial cognition, thinking, language, and communication, including depictions, descriptions, maps, diagrams, instructions, sketches, illustrations, gestures, and comics. These interests have taken her to collaborations with computer scientists, philosophers, chemists, biologists, geographers, geologists, educators, linguists, designers, architects, and artists. She is gratified by what seems to be an explosion of interest in visual and spatial thinking and communication in so many arenas.


Monika Weiss is a transdisciplinary artist whose work examines relationships between body and history, and evokes ancient rituals of lamentation as traditionally performed in response to war. Her public performances, films, installations and sound works often incorporate drawing as a performative language sited within the space of historical memory and contemporary urban landscape. Her current work considers aspects of public memory and amnesia as reflected within the physical and political space of a City. In 2005 Lehman College Art Gallery (CUNY) organized a retrospective of the artist’s work, Monika Weiss-Five Rivers, which was reviewed in The New York Times. Recent solo museum exhibitions include Centre for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle, Warsaw, Poland (2010), and Museum of Memory and Human Rights, Santiago, Chile (2012 – 2013). Weiss’ writings have appeared in numerous publications including New Realities: Being Syncretic (Springer, Wien/New York) and Technoetic Arts (Intellect, London). The artist divides her time between New York City and St. Louis, where she is currently professor at Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, Washington University. Weiss’ work in represented by Galerie Samuel Lallouz, Montreal and in public collections internationally, including CIFO Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation, Miami, and Frauenmuseum, Bonn.


Anna Willieme is the founder and director of ArtMed inSight which explores the connections between art and medicine and is currently collaborating with leading medical institutions in both New York and Boston.

Capturing Life, 4 Studies of eye-hand coordination during drawing on 18/09/2013 at 08:39

­CAPTURING LIFE   is a documentary film by John Tchalenko that will be premiering at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on October 25th, as part of the Thinking through Drawing conference.  The filmmaker will be present at the screening to discuss his work.

The 52-minute documentary Capturing Life is based on a series of studies on drawing from life, including direct observations, eyetracker studies and and MRI brain scan investigations carried out by researcher John Tchalenko (University of the Arts London), neuroscientist Chris Miall (University of Birmingham) and artist Humphrey Ocean RA. Their collaboration, which started in 1999 with The Painter’s Eye Movements at the National Portrait Gallery London, has encompassed several Wellcome Trust and Leverhulme Trust projects and exhibitions. Altogether, about 100 artists, art students and novices were examined in an attempt to find out more about cognitive drawing strategies. Many intriguing facts about how a vision of the external world is transformed into a drawing or painting were brought to light and are presented here for the first time to a general and specialized public.

The film is structured around four eye-hand interaction observations during drawing and painting: (1) Thea, a 2½ year old child who is already using a drawing strategy in which the eyes lead the hand; (2) Humphrey Ocean, a portrait painter, capturing visual information just in time to paint the next detail; (3) the sculptor Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) using a direct vision-to-motor process without ever looking at his hand or paper while drawing; and (4) Alexis Deacon, illustrator, drawing from life while Chris Miall, brain scientist, outlines the neurological regions involved at each of the different stages.

WWW Drawing Film from Penn State on 18/09/2013 at 07:57

This is an essay by Mehrdad Hadighi, Department Head, Professor, and Stuckeman Chair of Integrative Design, Stuckeman School, regarding a film that was made last spring with their students.  We will be showing the film on Friday, October 25, at the Metropolitan Museum.


There has been much recent conversation about drawing, perhaps due to the ubiquity of digitally output “drawings.” Articles have been written about the implicit value of hand drawing in comparison to computer-generated drawings; conferences and symposia on drawing have been held, even asking if drawing is dead!

WWW Drawing refers to two realms.  One is the realm of the three “W” authors —West, Wines and Webb — who were on campus at Penn State University in late March 2013, making large-scale drawings with students in the Stuckeman Family Building. The other is the realm of the World Wide Web.  This pairing is intended to instigate an exploration of the realm of drawing in relationship to techniques and technologies, above all through the physical act of drawing, but also by thinking, theorizing and writing about it.

To read more, click here

Conference Accommodations on 10/09/2013 at 13:17

Union Theological Seminary Landmark Guest Rooms

landmark@uts.columbia.edu
212-280-1313

International House Guest Rooms

500 Riverside Drive (near Tiemann Place)
212-316-8436

Local Hotels
Listed by increasing distance:

Hotel Newton

2528 Broadway (between W 95th & 96th Streets)
800-643-5553, 212-678-6500 or 888-HOTEL58

Days Hotel Broadway [used to be Quality Hotel on Broadway]

215 West 94th Street (at Broadway)
800-866-6400

Aloft Harlem Hotel

2296 Frederick Douglas Blvd
212-749-4000

Hotel Alexander

304 West 94th Street
212-665-0003

Hotel Lucerne

201 West 79th Street (at Amsterdam Avenue)
800-492-8122

Hotel Belleclaire

250 West 77th Street (at Broadway)
877-468-3522

Beacon Hotel

2130 Broadway (at W 75th Street)
800-572-4969

Hudson Hotel

356 West 58th Street (at 9th Avenue)
800-606-6090

Dream Hotel

210 West 55th Street
866-437-3266

The Time Hotel

224 West 49th Street
212-246-5252 or 1-877-TIME-NYC

Hotel QT

125 West 45th Street (at 8th Avenue)
212-354-2323

Local Hostels
International Youth Hostel

891 Amsterdam Ave (at West 103rd Street)
212-932-2300

Other Hotels
Visit http://www.hostels.com for reservations and other Hostel listings

Many larger, mostly chain, hotels are on Manhattan, all easily accessible to travel hubs (Port Authority Bus Terminal, Penn Station, Grand Central Station) and a subway ride from Union.

Listed by increasing distance from the Seminary

Comfort Inn Central Park West

31 W 71st Street (between Central Park West & Columbus Avenue)
877-727-5236 or 212-721-4770

Holiday Inn Midtown

440 W 57th Street (at Ninth Avenue)
800-465-4329 or 212-581-8100

Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers

811 Seventh Avenue (at 53rd Street)
888-625-5144 or 212-581-1000

New York Hilton

1335 Sixth Avenue (at 53rd Street)
800-445-8667 or 212-586-7000

Crowne Plaza Times Square Manhattan

1605 Broadway (between W 48th & 49th Streets)
800-243-6969 or 212-977-4000

Renaissance New York Hotel Times Square

Two Times Square (714 Seventh Avenue at W 48th Street)
800-468-3571 or 212-765-7676

Doubletree Guest Suites Hotel in Times Square

1568 Broadway (at 47th Street)
800-222-8733 or 212-719-1600

W New York – Times Square

1567 Broadway (at 47th Street)
877-WHOTELS (877-946-8357) or 212-930-7400

Comfort Inn Midtown

129 W 46th Street (between Sixth & Seventh Avenues)
800-565-7720 or 212-221-2600

New York Marriott Marquis

1535 Broadway (between W 45th & 46th Streets)
800-228-9290 or 212-398-1900

Hilton Times Square

234 W 42nd Street (between Seventh & Eighth Avenues)
800-523-8699

Courtyard Marriott Hotel

114 W 40th Street (at Broadway)
800-321-2211 or 212-391-0088